SPRING EQUINOX & TRADITIONS

SPRING EQUINOX & TRADITIONS

We are approaching the spring equinox, which will fall on 20 March.

On the 21st we will celebrate it working with this powerful energy together.

(check here for more info)

The present energies combined with practices with dedication to oneself will help to enter into this new phase. 

Nature manifests its awakening and the beginnings of its blossoming in full. 

A DEEP

PURIFICATION IN PROGRESS.

The organism will eliminate all toxins accumulated during the winter and continue the work of vibrational upliftment and purification that began more than 15 years ago.

We will feel that we have left behind heavy baggage and despite the confused emotions, the call for new paths will be powerful.

From 20 March, a strong wind will blow, forcing each of us in a new direction 

The astrological new year also begins, strengthened by the closures that will occur during the lunar eclipse on

25 March.

Ps those who attend on 21 March will also receive a special meditation for 25 March so that they can continue to work on themselves consistently.

WHAT IS ABOUT THE SPRING EQUINOX?

The word “equinox” comes from the Latin aequus, meaning “equal” and “nox”, night.

This term therefore refers to the time when day and night are approximately the same length.

In the northern hemisphere, the spring equinox (also known as the March equinox) occurs when the Sun crosses the equator line, heading north.

This event marks the beginning of the spring season in the northern half of the planet. 

After this date, the northern hemisphere begins to tilt more towards the Sun, resulting in more daylight hours and warmer temperatures.

Conversely, in the southern hemisphere, the March equinox marks the beginning of autumn as the southern hemisphere begins to be tilted away from the Sun.

WHAT HAPPENS WITH THE SPRING EQUINOX?

The Equinox is an astronomical event caused by the tilt of the Earth on its axis and its incessant orbit around the Sun.

Due to the particular inclination of planet Earth, its northern and southern hemispheres switch places throughout the year to receive the sun’s light and heat more directly. 

During the equinox, the Sun passes through the imaginary line of the ‘celestial equator’. When it passes south to north it marks the spring equinox while north to south marks the autumnal equinox.

An equinox occurs twice a year – spring and autumn – when the tilt of the earth’s axis and the earth’s orbit around the sun combine in such a way that the sun illuminates the southern and northern hemispheres equally. 

The equinoxes are the only two times a year when the Sun rises in the east and sets in the west for all of us on Earth.

After the spring equinox, the northern hemisphere tilts towards the Sun. Although in most places the amount of daylight is increased each day after the winter solstice, after the spring equinox, many places will experience more daylight than darkness over 24 hours. The amount of daylight per day will continue to increase until the summer solstice in June, during which the longest period of daylight occurs.

SPRING EQUINOX TRADITIONS AROUND THE WORLD: HOW IS IT CELEBRATED?

In many cultures around the world, the spring equinox is a significant event and cause for great celebration with special rituals to welcome the new season and the new energy that comes with it, such as sowing and the new harvest season.

This passage symbolises themes of rebirth, renewal and fertility: many cultures celebrated their new years during or around the spring equinox.

Symbols of new life are most representative of this period and often recall symbols associated with the Christian feast of Easter, which always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the March equinox.

Numerous festivals have been held around the world at this time of year since ancient times, with rituals also involving the theme of good triumphing over evil, as sunlight regains dominion over darkness, cold and night.

HOLI FESTIVAL OF INDIA

Hindu culture celebrates the arrival of spring with numerous celebrations, the most popular of which is known as Holi and has become popular mainly in India and Nepal.

The festival celebrates important Hindu legends that tell of the triumph of Good over Evil, with the lighting of huge bonfires on the night before the spring equinox, around which the public is encouraged to dance, while during the day people all over the country throw powdered colours and coloured water with balloons and spray guns in a game that lasts for two days and brings a widespread spirit of joy throughout the country. 

THE NOROOZ – IRAN

In Persian culture, the term literally translates as the first day of the new year, which coincides with the celebration of the spring equinox. It is a popular time throughout the region of Iran with celebrations centred on a new beginning, prosperity and blossoming. 

Norooz rituals begin about three weeks before the actual equinox, with a thorough cleansing of one’s home in order to be surrounded in the New Year by a tidy and clean space.

During this period of purification, it is common to see countless Persian carpets hanging outside homes, ready to be beaten clean of dust.

The last Wednesday evening before the equinox kicks off the tradition of ‘Red Wednesday’ where public spaces are lit with bonfires to signify the hope for happiness and enlightenment in the coming year as people party in the streets.

 

DRUIDS AT STONEHENGE IN ENGLAND

The symbol par excellence of all the seasonal passages of the sun, including the March equinox, is the mythical Stonehenge, which has always

seen groups of Druids and Wiccans gather among its

imposing stones to greet the rising sun, which they celebrate as Ostara.

Dressed as ancient Druids, people gather here at the dawn of the equinox to wait for the sunrise by drinking ancient natural extracts, dancing and playing according to ancient pagan customs.

SHUNBUN NO HI OF JAPAN

In Japanese culture, the spring equinox is celebrated very differently from the rest of the world.

Although the March equinox is still celebrated as the arrival of spring, the Japanese people, following an ancient Buddhist belief, visit and clean the graves of their ancestors and loved ones, honouring them with flowers and traditional food.

KURDISH BONFIRES IN TURKEY

The Kurdish people in Turkey celebrate the New Year to coincide with the spring equinox. On the eve, bonfires are lit to symbolise the passing of the dark winter season and the arrival of the spring season, new clothes are worn, spring flowers are picked, and amidst a series of traditional songs and dances, poems are recited and shards are broken for good luck. 

 

 

 

EGG GAMES IN CHINA

During the spring equinox all over China people play the standing egg game, tradition dictates that whoever can make an egg stand will have good luck for themselves.

Eggs are often associated with the spring equinox as a symbol of birth and fertility and the myth that one can only be in balance on that day probably refers to the rebalancing of day and night. 

THE DROWNING OF MARZANNA IN POLAND

The Poles celebrate the change of season by symbolically burying the winter. Children make straw effigies of an ice maiden called Marzanna, dress her in a wedding dress, put a crown on her head and then throw her into a river or lake or set her on fire. When she leaves, they gather flowers and branches and decorate them with ribbons and beads to welcome the new season.

THE CROMLECH OF ALMENDRES IN PORTUGAL 

The Almendres Cromlech in Portugal is one of the oldest megalithic complexes in the world and thousands of years older than Stonehenge.

Situated on an east-facing hillside, surrounded by a grove of cork and olive trees, it is thought to be a primitive astronomical observatory where, on the morning of the equinox, the sun rises along the axis of the monument, casting shadows in a line on the stones. For this reason, those who manage to access it perform a series of ancient rituals as the sun rises.

THE LAS FALLAS FESTIVAL IN VALENCIA, SPAIN

The Las Fallas festival in Valencia, Spain, takes place in the week before the first day of spring. Participants in the festival wear medieval-style clothes and parade huge papier-mâché figurines filled with firecrackers through the streets.

Every night fireworks fill the sky and on the eve of the first day of spring the figurines are set on fire.